OFF RADAR

passengers by countryLast week, it was quite interesting to watch a program about the missing aircraft Malaysian Airline flight MH370. I learnt things about the whole situation I never knew before. Sure, it was all over the news, but some things weren’t released (or I’d missed them), and it’s nice to hear what is still happening with locating missing Malaysian flight MH370.

Two hundred and thirty-nine crew and passengers from fourteen different countries just up and vanished from radar not long after take-off on 8th March 2014, having departed Kuala Lumpa at 12:43am.

When the systems went all dark, there was no contact with the plane. Questions surrounding the silence were pointing towards possible high jacking or an explosion. The aircraft’s maintenance had all checked out prior to departure, so there was no reason to suspect a malfunction.

Everyone was watching China to see if the plane would show up on schedule or not. It was due to land at Beijing at 6:30am. However, it never arrived. At 5:30am, an emergency was declared, and the Malaysian Prime Minister notified at 6:30am when the plane failed to arrive.

Malaysian Prime MinisterAt the onset of the press release, several hours after the plane disappeared off radar, the world was on edge, waiting for news of what had happened. Where was Malaysian flight MH370? Obviously, something wasn’t right. Everyone was desperate for answers, especially the families of those on the flight. The waiting would have been tremendous for all of them! I can only imagine what it would have been like.

The search was concentrated around where flight MH370 had been lost on radar. None of the local fishermen who were working at that time saw anything which could have been a plane crashing.

After twelve hours of searching, there was still no sight of the plane. There had been many sightings reported from all different directions, but no plane or wreckage had yet been found. The pressure for answers was growing.

The main concern, though, remained that of the families waiting to hear of the fate of their loved ones. Were they alive? When were they coming home? Where was flight MH370?

The Prime Minister addressed the media at this point, but there was nothing to tell.

17M-Missing plane search MAP.jpgJust when things seemed hopeless, news came that the Airforce radar had a recording of the flight at the time it disappeared from the airport radar. For sme reason, the aircraft turned back towards the island of Panang.

Was it in trouble?

What the hell was going on?

The search area was a huge 27000 nmi over two possible areas. Despite the assistance of forty-two ships and thirty-nine aircraft, there was no success in locating the missing plane. Malaysian time 2:05am was the last known recording of flight MH370. Everyone was hoping for the best even though there was no positive indication over the past forty-eight hours of where the plane was.

There was no real advancement in answers or locating the aircraft until eight days after it disappeared. Mysterious signals between the plane and a satellite revealed that flight MH370 had definitely turned back over Beijing Peninsula and kept going for six and a half hours. It looked like it travelled until it ran out of fuel. Flight officials confirmed the plane would have had enough fuel for about seven hours so this appeared to be the most likely explanation.

Was it terrorists?

A check on each passenger resulted in no one known to be on any terrorist watch list, so it was highly unlikely.

searching for MH370 ships and planesThe only way to know what really happened on Malaysian flight MH370 was to find the flight recorders.

Due to the flight crossing over eleven countries, and being unable to confirm an exact position, it resulted in a mammoth 1,000,00 square miles search area! Those eleven countries helped in the search. Frustratingly, there was no sign of the plane on any of their radars. It was discovered, beyond any reasonable doubt, the reason for nothing being on these countries’ radars was because its journey ended in the middle of the Indian Ocean west of Perth.

It’s a remote location far from any landing site, and with the ocean being cold, violent and a depth of 6,000m, the survival of anyone aboard the plane was extremely low.

It was the worst possible outcome. There was more known about the surface of the moon than the 60,000 square kilometres of search area at the bottom of the Indian Ocean. Australia joined Malaysia and China in the search.

In 2014, a wing of Malaysian flight MH370 washed up on an island in Madagasca, 120,000 square miles from where it’s journey had ended. The search ceased in 2015 when there was no new evidence of where the plane could be.

Malaysia Missing Plane Debris CluesMalaysia has declared they will never stop looking for flight MH370. They cannot accept that a plane of its size cannot be located.

So, this year, 2018, a company called Infinity has been contracted to continue looking for the missing aircraft.

The whole world wants to know what happened. But we may never find out.

Maybe, it will be discovered like the Titanic was – with new technology many decades later.

Or it may just remain a mystery like many other missing planes and ships within the Bermuda Triangle – forever pondering.

No matter what, it is both concerning and intriguing as to the true fate of Malaysian flight MH370. If we can’t find out what happen for certain, how can it be truly prevented in the future? We’re left with speculation, assumption, fear and bewilderment. With all of the technology we have access to in this day and age, why can we not keep track of a simple plane trip from one point to another? How can a plane just disappear off radar?

Scarey? You bet!

MH370 a tribute in the sand

 

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